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614L-8 ADF Control Head Hacking, Part 2 January 31, 2013

Posted by phoenixcomm in ADF, Collins 614L-8, DIY Aircraft Cockpit, Flight Simulation, Radio Sub System.
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The Plan Continued.

  • We need to pick a embedded cpu. The requirements are:
    • It must handle all of the GPIO (see part 1 for the I/O Table), or about 20 pins.
    • It needs a USB interface for a data link to talk to the host.
    • It needs to generate the BFO signal.
    • It needs a PWM output to drive the meter.
  • We need to design a interface card. It should have a relay for the Dial Lamps, and a connection to the Panel Lamp Dimmer. It should have a jack to connect the gain potentiometer to the audio system. It should also have an output for the ADF flags, in various instruments.
  • We also need to replace the syncro with static digital encoder. It must be static as when the system powers up there is no guarantee where the dial will be tuned to. Remember this is just a AM radio.
  • Here is a block diagram of the ADF systemADF-System
  • Now we must get the syncro out of the frame. Here is an abbreviated version, I will post some photos when I do the work.
    (TM 11-5826-255-35 page 3-12):

    1. Loosen two Dxus fasteners located on rear cover, and slide the rear cover off the control unit.
    2. Remove three screws and three lock washers securing retaining (rear) plate to frame.
    3. Remove fixed resistor from retaining (rear) plate by removing the screw.
    4. Remove four screws and nuts securing connector to the retaining (rear) plate.
    5. Remove the retaining (rear)plate.
    6. Loosen two setscrews on collar, and remove spur gear from shaft of helical gear.   Note. If the setscrews cannot be reached, the tuning gear train must be disassembled.
    7. Loosen two setscrews on collar, and remove spur gears from the shaft of transmitter syncro.
    8. Remove collar.
    9. Loosen the three screws located around transmitter synchro at the shaft end.
    10. Orient three rim-clinching clamps to permit removal of transmitter synchro and remove the transmitter synchro.
  • Remember re-assembly is just the reverse order. Make sure that you keep all of the screws, etc. in a nice safe place. What I like to do is to put the screws back where they came from.
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614L-8 ADF Control Head Hacking, Part 1 January 30, 2013

Posted by phoenixcomm in ADF, Collins 614L-8, DIY Aircraft Cockpit, Flight Simulation, Radio Sub System.
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Collins 614L-8

Collins 614L-8

This is the ADF Control Head that I chose form my project.  It is a Collins 614L-8. they are plentiful on Ebay.

The Analysis    The Unit is tuned via a 400hz syncro transmitter. So it looks like I will have to find a replacement for the syncro.  The Loop Switch in the upper left must be rewired and the switch logic for the Band Selector Switch behind the Tuning Knob seams ok, but that will have to be verified. The Gain Control is just a 5k pot,  and the Function Switch behind it just need some pull-up resistors. It looks like I can drive the Tuning Meter with a PWM signal from the controller.  Also there is a BFO Switch which induces 142.5 Khz signal on top of the audio.

The Plan   Well first I need to score a copy of the maintenance manual they are kind of pricey on Ebay so I dug a little more. In the military the Control Unit is part of AN/ARN-83 and I found pdf copies of TM 11-5826-225-12 and TM 11-5826-225-35 with schematic, part diagrams, etc. Also you can score the operators manual here.

Next we have to identify the goes inta and the goes outas, so here goes:

Connections Map
PIN I/O DESCRIPTION CPU PORT CPU PIN
O Loop Ant, Right Step
O Loop Ant, Right Slew
O Loop Ant, Left Step
O Loop Ant, Left Slew
O Function Switch, ADF
O Function Switch, ANT
O Function Switch, LOOP
O Range Switch, 190 – 400
O Range Switch, 400 – 850
O Range Switch, 850 – 1750
O BFO Switch
 O Gain Control, Bottom
O Gain Control, Top
 O Gain Control, Arm
 I Tuning Meter
GROUND
 P Dial Lamps
 P Panel Lamps

The Tuning Meter is a dc micro-ammeter requiring 100 micro-amps for full scale deflection.

Stellaris LM4F120 LaunchPad Evaluation Board or the best 13 bucks you ever spent! December 2, 2012

Posted by phoenixcomm in Arduino, DIY Aircraft Cockpit, Flight Simulation, Linux, ps2 keybaord, Software, TI Cortex™-A8 CPU, TI EK-LM4F120XL LaunchPad, TI Stellaris.
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What in the world do you get for $12.99?? LM4F120_LaunchpadYou get this cool 80Mhz 32 bit ARM Cortex M4F Launchpad Board!

So lets take a look at this thing. Well for openers we get both 16/32 bit instruction, and the F stands for Floating Point. It comes with its own on-board USB In-Circuit Debugger. On-board I/O is USB,  CAN, SPI, PWM,  ADC. 16 MHz main xtal oscillator, 33MHz Real-Time Clock xtal. And plenty of memory: 256KB of 40Mhz Flash, 2KB of EEPROM, 24KB SSRAM, an MPU.

TI has provided a great Student Guide and Lab Manual. I went to TI training it cost me $25.00 and I got my kit plus the Ken Tec QVGA TFT display with a resistive touch overlay. 350px-Kentec With this I can model my CDU with out any of my hardware. I also found a nice App Note on using this board as a I/O processor (shows you how to hook up a PS2 keyboard). I looks like I can put my code that’s in my Linux box into the Stellaris board, but at this time im not shure of my code size as yet.  I have only been messing about with this for a month. But I have been busy moving 😦

Now for what do you use for the IDE? Nope we can use Code Composer 5 (Eclipse) and the licence is forever as long as you have the board plugged in. No you can remove it and put in a different one.

Meet the Arduino Killer!! The BeagleBone! November 5, 2012

Posted by phoenixcomm in Arduino, Beagle Board, BeagleBone, DIY Aircraft Cockpit, Flight Simulation, Linux, ps2 keybaord, TI Cortex™-A8 CPU.
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All I can say is: Holly crap Batman

they got it right!

I plugged in the little board (its size is 3.4″ × 2.1)Image It comes out of the box with the Angstrom Linux distro, an RJ45 (Ethernet) and 2 USB ports, one is to connect to your host and the other is for devices, and then just a shit load of I/O! let me explain: two I²C ports, five UARTs,  a SPI interface, a CAN interface, eight PWM ports for motor control etc, eight Analog-to-Digital Converters, and count them 66 general purpose Digital I/O pins!! There are a mess of Shields but here their called Capes, an no your Arduino Shields will not fit.

Gone is the Arduino  bastard kind of C language! Now instead of their smallish library, you can draw on 35+ years of code. No more add-hock programming. It’s not a new paradigm its Linux.  Now I can write and test my code in Eclipse, move it to the bone, recompile / re-target it, or do that on the desktop and run it!

Ok the Bone has a 720Mhz TI Cortex™-A8 CPU, 256Mb DRAM, + Flash. All of this for just under 90 bucks!

Ok like I said before I plugged it into my Linux Mint desktop via the USB port. The board came up within less than 10 seconds. I located it in the finder told it to ‘exit’ thats to change modes on the USB interface,  and then in Chrome and entered 192.168.7.2 in the URL bar and hit enter and I am in the Cloud9 IDE but more about that later.

Enjoy!!

BTW: My first Challenge is to migrate the PS/2 keyboard code from the Arduino Playground. http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Main/PS2Keyboard to the BeagleBoard.

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